Category Archives: Neo-Calvinism

Why I Love (all about) Kuyper


From John Halsey Wood’s Going Dutch in the Modern Age: Kuyper departed from Calvin and his Reformation forbears on one critical point, a deviation that imprinted his ecclesiology with a distinctively modern tint. The church had to be absolutely separated from the state. The Reformation was right to break up Rome’s worldchurch, wherein a single… Read More→

Also posted in Adventures in Church History, Modern Church, New World Presbyterianism, Novus Ordo Seclorum, W-w | Tagged , , , , | 5 Responses

Having Your Organism and Organizing It Too


Tim Keller devotes several chapters to cultural engagement in his book Center Church. In it he shows that he may have as much time as Fr. Dwight does for reading and reflection beyond sermon prep. Keller sees problems in both the transformational model and 2k, and in his ever constant search for a “third” way,… Read More→

Also posted in Because Someone Has to Provide Oversight, Christ and culture, Jure Divino Presbyterianism, spirituality of the church | Tagged , , , | 21 Responses

When Christianity Goes Cosmic


Roman Catholics fall for neo-Calvinists. Michael Sean Winters closes his reflections on James Bratt‘s biography of Kuyper with a big finish: It would be wrong to finish this treatment of Bratt’s book without mentioning Kuyper’s most famous quote, uttered in his “sphere sovereignty” speech inaugurating the Free University: “there is not a square inch in… Read More→

Also posted in Roman Catholicism, W-w | Tagged , , , | 3 Responses

Why Kuyperians Don’t Like 2k


Michael Sean Winters is reading James Bratt’s biography of Abraham Kuyper and quotes the following assessment of the Dutch statesman: Nowhere did he so minimize the effects of sin as in his assumptions about the macro level of social development. Sometimes – for instance, in his speech against “Uniformity” – he could spy a fearful… Read More→

Also posted in Adventures in Church History, spirituality of the church | Tagged , , , , | 386 Responses

Politics of Inclusion


Matt Tuininga calls for the gospel politics of inclusion even while excluding some — ahem — from the Reformed camp. But let’s not go there. Let’s go instead to an apparent confusion of categories that invariably happens when you make the gospel (Jesus Christ died for sinners, there’s not one square inch, man’s chief end… Read More→

Also posted in Because Someone Has to Provide Oversight, Being Human, Book of Nature, Novus Ordo Seclorum | Tagged , , , , , | 39 Responses

Piling On


So thanks to Matt Tuininga’s critique of Scott Clark and mmmmmeeeEEEEEE, Stephen Wolfe adds to Clark’s and my misery: I think that Matthew Tuininga has made a valuable correction to D.G. Hart and R. Scott Clark who seem to find no social value in Christian sanctification. Would not our conformity to the image of the… Read More→

Also posted in Reformed Protestantism, spirituality of the church | Tagged , , , , , | 51 Responses

With Friends Like These


This caught my eye (from under the bus). Matt Tuininga calls me a friend and I guess that’s supposed to weaken the sting of what’s included: But Scott Clark’s version and Darryl Hart’s version is not the Reformed version. And it is not just their conclusions about religion in the public square that are different.… Read More→

Also posted in Jure Divino Presbyterianism, spirituality of the church | Tagged , , , | 137 Responses

The Appeal and Limits of 2k


For some like John Stackhouse, keeping the church out of politics is a big duh (via the juicy ecumenists): 10. Because no one trained you properly to get involved with politics—and a little seminar, however exciting, won’t make up for that yawning deficit. (Do you think politicians can be trained to be pastors by attending… Read More→

Also posted in Adventures in Church History, Are the CTCers Paying Attention?, Christianity and the West, Roman Catholicism, spirituality of the church | Tagged , , , | 99 Responses

Woe to Dualism

holistic orb

Is Neo-Calvinism the gateway drug to Islam? Here‘s why I ask: Western observers have difficulty making sense of this Renewal because of our Western biases concerning religion and politics: “The most important source of Western confusion about the meaning of the Renewal is the insistence on distinguishing between Islam as religion and so-called political Islam.… Read More→

Also posted in Being Human, Christianity and the West, Novus Ordo Seclorum | Tagged , | 3 Responses

Al Mohler To the Rescue


I have often thought of the PCA as Southern Baptists who sometimes baptize infants. The autonomy of PCA congregations, the convention-like atmosphere of the General Assembly, and the original southerness of the PCA are reasons for the comparison. To be fair, the OPC is likely the Presbyterian equivalent of Reformed Baptists. Our assemblies work twelve… Read More→

Also posted in Because Someone Has to Provide Oversight, New World Presbyterianism, W-w | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 41 Responses