Tag Archives: papacy

Where Would Christian Europe be without the Emperor?

A04_PopeAdrian

That’s what Peter Heather makes readers ask in The Restoration of Rome: Thanks to Charlemagne’s attentions, the papacy was enriched, visited, courted and paid enormous respect, but all these gains came with a price tag. The emperor’s respect for the papacy was genuine, but he was equally convinced. . . that he had his own… Read More→

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Posted in Adventures in Church History, Are the CTCers Paying Attention?, Roman Catholicism | Also tagged , | 8 Responses

Overreach

Versailles_20100617

Peter Leithart is reading about the French Enlightenment and Revolution and comments on Tocqueville‘s observations: The root of the hatred was not dogma but the church’s role as a “political institution.” Because of the church’s role in the old society, it too had to be “dashed to pieces” to make way for the new society.… Read More→

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If So Many Mediators, Why Only One Pope?

Sedia-piusxii

Here is part of Charles Pope’s (real name) response to a Protestant who insists that the Bible teaches that Christians have only one mediator, Jesus Christ: Rather we speak of a subordinate mediation when we seek the prayers of the saints, or of one another. For indeed we could have no communion with them or… Read More→

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Rome in American Exceptionalism

tricolore-risorgimento-300x294

A constant refrain among Jason and the Callers is the notion that Roman Catholicism has one, holy, catholic, and apostolic interpretive paradigm for reading the past. (Jason has 26 posts in the category of paradigm.) I believe this is supposed to apply to the early church fathers as much as Trent, Vatican I, or the… Read More→

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Conciliarism on the Eve of Reformation

Oakley (1)

It may come as no surprise to hear that Thomas Cardinal Cajetan, Luther’s chief antagonist in 1518 at the meeting in Augsburg, was a high papalist who took a decidedly anti-conciliar position with his 1511 work, De comparatione auctoritatis papae et concilii. As Francis Oakley explains, this book by Cajetan disrupted the council, then meeting… Read More→

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Conciliarism Is What Christ Founded (or at least preceded high-papalism)

Oakley (1)

The crucial decree at the Council of Constance, in Francis Oakley’s story, is Haec Sancta, part of which reads (and according to the Vatican website contradicts Vatican I on “papal primacy/infallibility”): In the name of the holy and undivided Trinity, Father and Son and holy Spirit. Amen. This holy synod of Constance, which is a… Read More→

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Step Aside Beza and Locke, Say Hello to Almain and Mair

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A week away gave me the chance to read another very impressive book by Francis Oakley, this time on conciliarism. I will be posting about the implications of Oakley’s argument not only for claims of papal supremacy but also for considering the relations between the Middle Ages and the Reformation. But for now, here’s an… Read More→

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Cutting Off His Hair to Spite his Head

Mad Men

If Jason Stellman is correct in his latest post, then people like himself could not have converted to Roman Catholicism prior to a full-blown theory of papal supremacy (which depending on the historian may not have happened until 1200). His minimalist account of apostolicity leads him to this: What, then, needs to have occurred in… Read More→

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Let the Interpretation Resume

Mad Men

Or Jason Stellman has some ‘splainin’ to do. Jason is still justifying his realignment by trotting out the familiar refrain that sola scriptura doesn’t solve anything, thus making Protestantism the road to ruin and mayhem. For the confessional Presbyterian, the reason the Confederation of Reformed Evangelical Churches is “not a [true] church” is that its… Read More→

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