Overseer Overload

Do bishops who claim apostolic succession have it this rough? (I am, by the way, according to the Form of Government for the Orthodox Presbyterian Church, a bishop: “Those who share in the rule of the church may be called elders (presbyters), bishops, or church governors. Those who minister in mercy and service are called deacons. Those elders who have been endued and called of Christ to labor also in the Word and teaching are called ministers” (FoG, V.3)

Last Friday after teaching a regular load, I got in the car and made the 3 and 3/4 hour drive to Cincinnati to give the first of three lectures at the conference, Reformed in America. I gave two more lectures the next day and then taught Sunday school at Good Shepherd OPC on — get this — Sunday. It was a very pleasant time with a lot of enjoyable folks. But it was a long weekend and I couldn’t even benefit from the company of Cordelia and Kabbigail.

Last night, in preparation for today’s session meeting, I finished minutes from our last gathering — the longest set of minutes I have yet to produce, mainly because the correspondence was thick and heavy. That process took almost two hours and I followed it up with a nightcap of filling out the statistical report for the Statistician of the OPC’s General Assembly. It’s not rocket science but neither is it as easy as surfing the web in search of hardware for shelves in the newly renovated bathroom.

Today’s meeting should not be overly long, but at 9:00 tonight I have the honor and privilege of participating in a conference call for the sub-committee of Christian Education that is working on the production of a Psalter-Hymnal with folks from the United Reformed Churches.

With all this avocational work, how would a Presbyterian elder ever have time for this?

My father-in-law, a Baptist minister, would have called all of this a glorious privilege. I am more inclined to think of this as something completely different from the sort of episcopal chores that lead some bishops to talk about a “poor church for the poor.” In the OPC’s case, it’s more like “middle-rank church officers volunteering for middle-class Presbyterians.”

If only we had bingo (but that would also bring the Bishop of Bling).

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14 thoughts on “Overseer Overload

  1. Good job, Darryl. I’ve got some Treasurer’s(er er er’s) duties I need to hand off. You’re perfect for it. Remember, It’s all glory. But shouldn’t it be more mediatorially oriented, I mean it needs some christological centering. Anyway, think about it, the files are in the mail. If you won’t, you can always send them back, I guess. I mean, it’s just for jesus. No biggie.

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  2. I thought about leaving you a comment to challenge 2k theology. Then I thought better and thought I shouldn’t leave you a comment. Then I posted this one. Keeping this as short as I reasonably can and saying as little as I can in order to help ease your already heavy load.

    Sorry I left Cordelia off my inquiriy, I care about her too, yo.

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  3. So, what you’re saying is, we’ve both got our mojo working, but only his works on you? I’ll have to see my gypsy woman for some advice.

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  4. Lest anyone think DG is crying crocodile tears, many of us can vouch for the load. In my serving days I was part of monthly session meetings that lasted 5-7 hours — not the norm, but crises may necessitate such. A good presbyterian session will take things seriously and that means slow, thorough, and steady. They actually have standards and policies and actually try to abide by them. Sometimes that is arduous, wrenching work. Most evangelical church officers would last about five minutes in the P&R world.

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  5. CW – A good presbyterian session will take things seriously and that means slow, thorough, and steady.

    I’ve gotten that wide-eyed look from some (Calvish) Baptists explaining undercare/licensure/ordiantion, let alone a presbytery meeting.

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  6. Seth, does Father Dwight have buyer’s remorse?

    in our darker moments some of us converts do sometimes wonder if we really have to dislike the Catholic Church quite so much.

    Never hear that from Jason and the Callers, except for maybe the lead singer.

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  7. D. G. Hart
    Posted February 12, 2015 at 1:01 pm | Permalink
    Seth, does Father Dwight have buyer’s remorse?

    in our darker moments some of us converts do sometimes wonder if we really have to dislike the Catholic Church quite so much.

    Your answer was in the paragraph above it.

    D. G. Hart
    Posted February 12, 2015 at 1:01 pm | Permalink
    Seth, does Father Dwight have buyer’s remorse?

    in our darker moments some of us converts do sometimes wonder if we really have to dislike the Catholic Church quite so much.

    I’ve often said, “I didn’t become a Catholic because I liked it. If I wanted a church I liked I’d still be an Anglican.”

    Yes, Anglicanism indeed. What’s not to like?

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