How to Observe Reformation

If you are Roman Catholic, forget Martin Luther and remember Thomas More:

We should not celebrate the Reformation, because we cannot celebrate the defense of erroneous conscience held up against the authority of the Church. As St. Thomas More rightly said in his “Dialogue on Conscience,” taken down by his daughter Meg: “But indeed, if on the other side a man would in a matter take away by himself upon his own mind alone, or with some few, or with never so many, against an evident truth appearing by the common faith of Christendom, this conscience is very damnable.” He may have had Luther in mind.

More did not stand on his own private interpretation of the faith, but rested firmly on the authority of Christendom and, as Chesterton put it, the democracy of the dead: “But go we now to them that are dead before, and that are I trust in heaven, I am sure that it is not the fewer part of them that all the time while they lived, thought in some of the things, the way that I think now.”

More is a crucial example of standing firm in a rightly formed conscience. We should remember why he died and not let his witness remain in vain. He stood on the ground of the Church’s timeless teaching, anchored in Scripture and the witness of the saints. If we divorce conscience from authority, we will end in moral chaos. As Cardinal Ratzinger asked in his lucid work, On Conscience: “Does God speak to men in a contradictory manner? Does He contradict Himself? Does He forbid one person, even to the point of martyrdom, to do something that He allows or even requires of another?” These are crucial questions we must face.

Rather than celebrating the defender of erroneous conscience, let’s remember and invoke the true martyr of conscience, who died upholding the unity of the faith.

But, if you’re Roman Catholic, you follow the pope, right?

In light of the current controversy on conscience, it is troubling that Luther is now upheld as genuine reformer. The most troubling is from the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity in its Resources for the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity and throughout the year 2017: “Separating that which is polemical from the theological insights of the Reformation, Catholics are now able to hear Luther’s challenge for the Church of today, recognising him as a ‘witness to the gospel’ (From Conflict to Communion 29). And so after centuries of mutual condemnations and vilification, in 2017 Lutheran and Catholic Christians will for the first time commemorate together the beginning of the Reformation.” The Vatican also announced a commemorative stamp (which to me sounds like the United States issuing a stamp commemorating the burning the White House by British troops).

Pope Francis has spoken of Luther several times in the past year, including in an inflight press conference returning from Armenia: “I think that the intentions of Martin Luther were not mistaken. He was a reformer. Perhaps some methods were not correct.” In response I ask, what did Luther reform? Francis pointed to two things in his journey to Sweden. The Reformation “helped give greater centrality to sacred scripture in the Church’s life,” but it did so by advocating the flawed notion of sola scriptura. Francis also pointed to Luther’s concept of sola gratia, which “reminds us that God always takes the initiative, prior to any human response, even as he seeks to awaken that response.” While the priority of God’s initiative is true and there are similarities to Catholic teaching in this teaching (that faith is a free gift that cannot be merited), Luther denied our cooperation with grace, our ability to grow in sanctification and merit, and that we fall from grace through mortal sin. Francis also noted, while speaking to an ecumenical delegation from Finland: “In this spirit, we recalled in Lund that the intention of Martin Luther 500 years ago was to renew the Church, not divide Her.” Most recently he spoke of how we now know “how to appreciate the spiritual and theological gifts that we have received from the Reformation.”

Doesn’t the magisterium know more and better than Dr. R. Jared Staudt?

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4 thoughts on “How to Observe Reformation

  1. Maybe Bryan can give us a “principled means” for knowing when Reformation is good or not. Cause evidently his church can’t.

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  2. Because they used the violence of the magistrates against their enemies, the Reformers are not heroes nor is Carl Truman nearly as dangerous as the pope antichrist, but the “catholic” assumption that the water humans name “Trinitarian” gives assurance of salvation is still a terrible invention of Satan’s kingdom.

    Carl Truman–“Many evangelicals have serious deviations from Nicene teaching on the Trinity…My sons grew up in Christian homes and cannot recall a day when they did not believe in the Lord Jesus Christ…When tempted by the Devil to doubt of his salvation, Luther pointed not to the Tower but to the baptismal font. ‘I have been baptized!’ was his consistent defense against Satan’s temptations.”

    skip one beat
    “This is not to advocate for Luther’s sacramental theology.”

    https://www.firstthings.com/web-exclusives/2017/03/the-most-dangerous-man-in-christendom

    If you find yourself in a situation in which you have not yet been watered by the true church, why should anybody be bothered about religious liberty for you? Being watered seems like a minimum step towards safety and assurance.

    “After God had launched Christianity by unarmed apostles God afterward raised up kings by whose wisdom God intended to protect His Church …. Conversionist sectarians do not like it that civil laws are enacted against their wickedness, saying that the apostles have asked no such thing of their kings — but these biblicists do not consider that those were different times. What emperor had at that time believed in Christ, in days in which Psalm 2 was still in effect: ‘Why do the nations rage ….’ When we invoke providentially given protection against stubborn and incorrigible heretics we only do what the authority of the keys teaches…”

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